Crime, Law, and Governance Studies

Specialization Coordinators: Rebecca Hanson, r.hanson@ufl.edu, and Richard Kernaghan, kernaghan@ufl.edu 

The Crime, Law, and Governance in the Americas (CLGA) Specialization in the Master of Arts in Latin American Studies (MALAS) program is designed to train students in the interdisciplinary, comparative study of crime, law, violence, justice, and related areas in Latin America and the U.S. This specialization also prepares students for research and applied careers in the fields of law and governance in the Americas.

Purpose of specializations in Latin American Studies
  • To help graduate students and advisors to navigate the vast and constantly shifting curricular landscape supporting Latin American Studies at UF.
  • To foster connection and collaboration around shared interests among current and prospective UF faculty and students.
Requirements for Master’s Degree in Latin American Studies at UF
  • Complete 30 credit hours, fulfilling distribution requirements listed below
  • Demonstrate advanced proficiency in Portuguese, Spanish, or Haitian Creole
  • Produce a thesis, internship, or capstone project
Course distribution requirements:
  • 6 hours of gateway seminars
    • LAS 6220 Issues and Perspectives in Latin American Studies
    • LAS 6293 Research Design and Methods in Latin American Studies
  • At least 15 of the 30 total hours completed in courses listed as LAS
  • Thesis students must register for LAS 6971 in the semester of graduation
  • Internship students must register for 3 credits of LAS 6949
  • 12 hours of courses in an interdisciplinary specialization*

*Students may take more than 12 credits—potentially as many as 21 of required 30 credits—in courses associated with interdisciplinary specialization of choice

CLGA SPECIALIZATION REQUIREMENTS

12 credits total, including courses from at least two academic programs. 

Core Courses: select 6-12 hours, with at least 3 credits in a LAS course.

  • LAS 6938 Law and Order in Latin America
  • LAS6938 Violence and Crime in Latin America
  • LAS 6938/SYA 7933 Policing the Americas
  • LAS 4935/LAS 6938 Human Rights in Latin America
  • ANG 6930 Readings in Legal Anthropology
  • ANG 6930 Ethnography of Illicit Worlds
  • CCJ 6920 Criminological Theories
Elective Courses

Select up to 6 hours of Elective Courses, with a recommendation to take 3 credits in Theory and Topics and 3 credits on Methods).

Theory and Topics Courses:

  • ANG 6930 War and Forgetting in the Americas
  • ANG 6930 Topographies of Law
  • ANG 6453 Human Rights in a Cross-Cultural Perspective
  • ANG 6452 Race and Racism in Anthropological Theory
  • ANG 6274 Principles of Political Anthropology
  • CCJ 6092 Drugs, Crime, and Policy
  • CCJ 6039 Law and Society
  • CCJ 5934 Gangs
  • CCJ 5934 Gender and Crime
  • CJC 6120 Corrections & Public Policy
  • LAS 6938 Crime and Criminality in the Americas
  • LAS 6938 Revolution in the Americas
  • LAS 6938/CPO 6307 Latin American Politics
  • LAS 6938 Introduction to Latin American History
  • LAS 6938 Law & Policy in the Americas
  • LAS 6938 Anthropology and Development in Latin America
  • LAS 6938 Democracy in Latin America
  • LAS 6938 Black Radicalism in the Americas
  • LAS 6938 Gender and Empowerment
  • LAS 6938 International Human Rights
  • LAS 6938 Queer Latin America
  • LAW 6936/LAS 6938 Trade & Human Rights in The Americas
  • SYA 7933 Race, Crime, and Law
  • SYA 7933 Race and US Latino/as
  • SYA 7933 Intersectionalities
  • SYD 6706 Racial and Ethnic Relations

Methods Courses:

  • ANG 6801 Ethnographic Field Methods
  • CCJ 6705 Research Methods in Crime, Law, & Justice
  • GEO 6166 Advanced Quantitative Methods for Spatial Analysis
  • GIS 5107C Geographic Information Systems in Research
  • POS 6737 Political Data Analysis
  • POS 6757 Survey Research
  • SYA 7933 Qualitative Methods
Frequency of course offerings

Before each semester, the Center compiles and posts online a Guide to hundreds of LAS-related courses available the coming semester. Some courses contributing to specializations are offered every semester, others once every few years. The list of courses provided here is not intended to guarantee any curricular offerings, but rather to open horizons to topics that have been and may be offered in widely varied programs around UF.

Additional courses

Each specialization offers students the opportunity to craft personalized programs of study and to add their own contributions. Students may identify additional courses relevant for a specialization, including new and one-time offerings, and may seek approval from the Specialization Coordinator to count such courses toward specialization credits.

FACULTY AND STAFF ENGAGED WITH THE CLGA SPECIALIZATION

Jeffrey Adler (History) U.S. Urban History, History Of Violence And Social Conflict, History of American Criminal Justice, and Nineteenth-Century America

Joel Correia (Latin American Studies)

Rebecca Hanson (Latin American Studies/Sociology; Venezuela and Colombia) Crime and Citizen Security, Political Sociology, Human Rights, Global Studies, Urban Sociology, Social Movements and Citizen Participation, Gender; Latin America, Qualitative Methods

Berta Esperanza Hernández-Truyol (Law) Civil Rights, Comparative Law, Human Rights, Human Trafficking, International and Regional Human Rights (Inter-America and Europe),  International and Transnational Law, LGBT Issues, Marriage Equality, Race & Race Relations  Sovereignty, War and War Crimes, Women, Gender and the Law

Richard Kernaghan (Anthropology; Peru and Amazonia) Legal Anthropology, Ethnography and Ethnographic Writing, Roads and Indigenous Populations

Marvin Krohn (Criminology) Juvenile Delinquency, Adolescent Substance Use, Sociology of Law

Jodi Lane (Criminology) Fear of Crime, Crime Policy, Corrections, Juvenile Justice, Evaluation Research

Jodi Schorb (English) History of U.S. Prison

Joseph Spillane (History) Development of Drug Addiction Research, Police Practice Relative to Illicit Markets

Heather Vrana (History; Central America) Student and Social Movements, Social Class, Race, Disability and History of Medicine, Nationalisms, Youth Politics and Culture, Popular Culture

Rebecca Williams (Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences) Human and Institutional Capacity Development